Practice Areas

Las Vegas Immigration Lawyers, Goodin Law P.A.

Immigration practice areas:

• Immigrant visa

• Non-immigrant visa

• Employment-based permanent visa

• Temporary work visa

• Business Immigration

• Green Card Lottery Program assistance

• Family based green card

• Marriage based green card

• Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) & Deferred Action for Parents

• Preparation for immigration interviews and representation at interviews

• Retaining US permanent resident status/Re-Entry Permits

• Naturalization and US citizenship application/N-648 medical waiver advice

• Renunciation of US Citizenship

Our Las Vegas immigration law firm serves US immigration and citizenship needs worldwide and client satisfaction is our first priority. We will make sure that you are informed of all of your possible options and that you understand the procedures every step of the way.

Not sure where to start?

Contact Goodin Law P.A., a Las Vegas immigration law firm. We offer free consultations in most immigration cases.
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Who Can We Help?

We provide expert legal advice about United States immigration law and legal representation to a wide range of clients seeking entry to the United States. We assist our clients with everything from temporary work visas to US citizen applications. Our focus is on you, the client.

We serve:

  • Professional workers
  • Blue collar and migrant workers
  • Students
  • Foreign or domestic businesses seeking to place employees in the U.S.
  • Family members of current U.S. residents
  • Diversity lottery recipients
  • Religious workers
  • Refugees and those seeking political asylum
  • Investors and Entrepreneurs
  • Temporary visitors to the U.S.
  • Aliens of extraordinary ability in the arts, sciences and business
  • Performing entertainers and athletes
  • Fiancé(e)s, spouses and minor children of permanent resident aliens

Our immigration law firm provides full-service professional advice and representation for your US immigration and visa needs.

Family & Marriage Green Cards

Family & Marriage Green Cards

Green Cards by Marriage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A major avenue through which persons can obtain a Permanent resident card commonly referred to as a “green card” is through a family member who is a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident (green card holder). These persons can immigrate to the United States either as immediate relatives of U.S. citizens (no caps or quotas) or through the family preference system which is governed by caps and annual numerical quotas.
Immediate relatives of US citizens are: a spouse, an unmarried minor children and a parent if the U.S. citizen is 21 or older. Some persons may have more than one green card option available. It is therefore necessary to evaluate their immigration options to determine which one would be fastest and most advantageous.
All applicants for a green card must be admissible to the United States. Past criminal convictions, misrepresentation, false claim to U.S. citizens may mean that a person is inadmissible. This means the person is barred from obtaining a green card a waiver is available and approved.

Spouses

A person in a bona-fide marriage to a U.S. citizen may be eligible for a green card. If the marriage is less than two years old at the time the person is granted a green card the person will receive a 2 year “conditional permanent resident card”. This means that the conditional resident status will terminate unless the person files a joint or waiver petition to remove conditions on residence within 90 days before the green card expires. Despite the best intentions some marriage may end in divorce, annulment or separation. Depending on the circumstances a person may still be able to remain a permanent resident despite the breakdown of the marriage.
If the person was lawfully admitted to the United States, the person may obtain a green card by a one step process which involves the filing an immigration petition by the U.S. citizen at the same time as the person’s application for a green card.

There is a two-step process for a person outside the United States to become an immigrant. First, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) must approve a petition filed by the U.S. citizen. Second, if the person is outside the United States the National Visa Center will notify the person to complete processing for an immigrant visa. A person who is inspected and lawfully admitted to the United States with a valid immigrant visa is a permanent resident upon admission.

Following the U.S. Supreme Court 2013 decision in the landmark case, United States v. Windsor, a marriage between same sex couples, is also valid for immigration purposes.

Parents

Parents of U.S. citizens (21 or older) can obtain a green card. Parents may include adoptive parents and stepparents even if the marriage creating the step-parent relationship has ended. A non-genetic gestational mother (person who carried and gave birth to the child) who is also the child’s legal mother at birth may now be recognized in the same way as genetic legal mothers are treated under the INA. In some cases blood tests, proof of cohabitation and support may be necessary to prove the parent-child relationship.

If the parent was lawfully admitted to the United States, the person may obtain a green card by a one step process which involves the filing an immigration petition by the U.S. citizen at the same time as the parent’s application for a green card.

There is a two-step process for a parent outside the United States to become an immigrant. First, the USCIS must approve a petition filed by the U.S. citizen. Second, the United States the National Visa Center will notify the parent to complete processing for an immigrant visa which will be issued at a U.S. Consulate abroad. A parent who is inspected and lawfully admitted to the United States with a valid immigrant visa is a permanent resident upon admission.

Child under 21

An unmarried person under 21 who is the child of a U.S. citizen can obtain a green card. The person is a child for immigration purposes if the definition of a child under Section 101 (b) of the INA is satisfied. Child may include legitimate child (born in wedlock), legitimated child (born out of wedlock), step-child, adopted child or orphan if specific requirements are met for each category of child. For a step-parent U.S. to immigrate a child the marriage creating the step parent must have occurred before the child was 18 years old. While a mother may petition for the immigration of her child to whom she for whom she was the legal mother at birth, the rules are different for fathers. For a natural father to immigrate a child born out of wedlock, legal custody and legitimation of the child must occur before age 18. A biological father may petition for an illegitimate child if a bona-fide parent-child relationship existed before age 21. Ties of blood are not enough. To establish a “bona fide parent-child relationship,” there should be a showing that the father and child at some point actually lived together, or that the father held out the child as his own, or that he provided for some or all of the child’s needs, or that in general the father’s behavior evidenced genuine concern for and interest in the child. See Matter of Vizcaino, 19 I & N Dec. 644 (BIA 1988).

Siblings

A person who is the sibling (brother or sister) of an adult U.S. citizen can obtain a green card through the sibling relationship. The person and the U.S. citizen must have at least one parent in common. The immigration process for siblings is a three-step process. First, the USCIS must approve a petition filed by the U.S. citizen. Second, the priority date of the immigrant visa petition receipt must become earlier than the cut-off date for sibling petitions on the visa bulletin of the U.S. State Department. This means that a visa number is available and processing of the immigrant visa application can begin. Third, if the person is outside the United States when an immigrant visa number becomes available, the National Visa Center will notify the person to complete processing for an immigrant visa which will be issued at a U.S. Consulate abroad.

Want to immigrate through a family member? Please contact us for a detailed review of your case.

Fiance Visa Petitions (K1 Visa)

K1 Visa PetitionsThe foreign fiancé of a U.S. citizen who is outside the United States may be eligible to obtain a K1 visa. A K1 visa is designed to facilitate admission of an intended immigrant into the United States. This visa allows the fiancé of a U.S. citizen to travel to the United States and marry the U.S. citizen sponsor within 90 days of arrival. Following the marriage the K1 nonimmigrant should apply for a conditional permanent resident status (the green card).
Both parties must have met each other met in person within the past two years. They must actually intend to marry each other and be legally free to marry from the filing of the visa petition to the fiancé’s admission into the United States. Marriage abroad before admission to the United States will void the K1 visa.

Unmarried minor children of the foreign fiancé may also be included in the fiancé visa petition. These minor children will be granted K2 visas if they will accompany or follow to join the K-1 visa principal. The children will also be eligible to apply for a green card following the timely marriage of the K-1 and the U.S. citizen sponsor.
The K1 visa process is a two-step process. First, the USCIS must approve a fiancé visa petition filed by the U.S. citizen. Second, a U.S. consulate must issue a visa following an application by the fiancé. Each consulate has its own requirements. A foreign fiancé of a U.S. citizen who is inside the United States may be able to get a green card by marriage to the U.S. citizen provided the fiancé is not inadmissible.

Over the years we have successfully represented many persons seeking K1 visas. Please contact us for a detailed review of your case.

U.S. Citizenship

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A person who has been a permanent resident for 5 years (3 years for spouses of U.S. citizens) may be eligible for U.S. citizenship by naturalization. To become a U.S. citizen a person must comply with 8 requirements, attend a naturalization interview and a formal oath ceremony.
Naturalization is available to a person who meets the following requirements:
1. Admitted as lawful permanent residents (LPR);
2. Is at least 18 years old when filing the application;
3. Resided in the United States continuously for five years before the application (three years for spouses of U.S. citizens);
4. Have been physically present in the United States for a total of at least one-half the period of required continuous residence (two and one-half years for most LPRs; one and one-half years for spouses of U.S. citizens);
5. Have resided for at least three months immediately before the naturalization application in the USCIS district in which the petition is filed;
6. Can read, write and speak Basic English;
7. Have knowledge and understanding of basic U.S. history and government; and
8. Possess good moral character.
Some exemptions may apply. For example, an applicant who is unable to comply with the English or Civics requirement because of a permanent disability may be exempt for these requirements using a medical disability waiver. There is also the 50/20 and 55/15 rule that exempts certain long term permanent residents from the English requirement. Also, a current or former military member who has served honorably in war or in times of hostility may be eligible for naturalization after being an LPR for a brief period. U.S. military service abroad may also exempt a person from the physical presence requirement.

Are you interested in becoming a US citizen? We have successfully represented persons seeking US citizenship by naturalization or in proving US citizenship through parents. Please contact us for a detailed review of your case.

E-2 Visa Treaty Investors

E-2 visas

The E-2 nonimmigrant classification allows a national of a treaty country (a country with which the United States maintains a treaty of commerce and navigation) to be admitted to the United States when investing a substantial amount of capital in a U.S. business. The investment must be a real and active commercial or entrepreneurial undertaking, producing goods or services, not an idle investment in stock or underdeveloped land. Certain employees of such a person or of a qualifying organization may also be eligible for E-2 status. E-2 visa holders are admitted for two years at a time, subject to extension in two-year increments. E-2 investor can live in the United States indefinitely as there is no overall limit on the length of time a person may remain in E status.
The spouses of E-2 visa holders are eligible for employment authorization and the issuance of an Employment Authorization Card.

Are you interested in investing in a business in the United States? Please contact us for a detailed review of your case.

Contact Goodin Law P.A., Las Vegas immigration lawyers. We offer free case evaluations in most US immigration law matters.